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Current research seminars

2017/18 Research Seminar Programme

Semester 1

Wednesday 20 September 2017
Brexit means?
…for the Economy
A roundtable conversation, moderated by Professor Gustavo San Román (CISI), with:
Brad Mackay, Professor of Strategy, School of Management, and Vice Principal (International Strategy and External Relations)
Dame Anne Pringle, Senior Governor, University Court and an experienced diplomat
David Ulph, Professor of Economics
Topics will include the Divorce and the Repeal Bills, the goal of “free and frictionless trade”, the perspective from Scotland and the opportunities that may come with Brexit.
Questions will also be taken from the audience.
4.00 - 5.30 pm, Byre Theatre
The event is free, but ticketed. Please visit the Byre Theatre webpage to get your tickets.

Thursday 28 September 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
Dr Eve Morisi, University of Oxford
‘"Just Killings? Albert Camus's Terrorisms"
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Thursday 5 October 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminar Series
Conflict and Change
Writer in Residence Christian Lehnert
‘Atomoi. Gedanken zu einer poetischen und religionslinguistischen Teilchenlehre’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Wednesday 11 October 2017
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Frank Muller, School of History
Concept: Towards a Regime of 'Functionalised Rulers': Constitutional Monarchy in 19th-Century Europe
Frankwill invite colleagues to consider why a particular dog did not bark in the nineteenth century - i.e. why the age of revolution did not produce an age of republics, why the profound social, political, cultural and technological changes Europe experienced between the French Revolution and the First World War never led to a monarchical mass extinction event. His answer is that the concept of constitutional monarchy (not just in its British parliamentary manifestation, but also in the Continental one that took its cue from the French "Chartre" of 1814) managed to adapt to and largely succeed at a set of monarchical functions that made changing forms of monarchical rule appear efficacious and acceptable to the majority of the relevant political forces. Monarchs communicated convincingly (and not entirely wrongly) that they continued to play a necessary role. And they put on a good show, too.
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room

Thursday 12 October 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Dr Emile Chabal, University of Edinburgh
‘Conflict and change: what France can tell us about the future of European political debate’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Thursday 19 October 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Professor Wen-chin Ouyang, SOAS
‘Places, people and things: traces of cultural encounters on the Silk Road in pre-modern writings’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Wednesday 25 October 2017
Brexit means?
…for the Economy
A series of roundtable discussions at the Byre Theatre, moderated by members of the Cultural Identity Studies Institute.
Peace and Security
4.00 - 5.30 pm, Byre Theatre
The event is free, but ticketed. Please visit the Byre Theatre webpage to get your tickets.

Thursday 2 November 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Dr Steffan Davies, University of Bristol
‘Disengaged Engagement: German Literature and the French Revolution in the 1790s’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Wednesday 8 November 2017
Brexit means?
…for the Economy
A series of roundtable discussions at the Byre Theatre, moderated by members of the Cultural Identity Studies Institute.
Identity
4.00 - 5.30 pm, Byre Theatre
The event is free, but ticketed. Please visit the Byre Theatre webpage to get your tickets.

Thursday 9 November 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Professor Lino Pertile, Harvard University
‘Dante, Primo Levi, and the Holocaust’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Wednesday 15 November 2017
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Aileen Fyfe & James Inglis, School of History
Object: A 1913 Remington typewriter
Aileen and James will consider how looking closely at the physical features (and sounds!) of typewriters will help shape their new project on technology, gender and consumer choice.
1pm, Byre Conference Room

Thursday 16 November 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Professor Nancy Condee, University of Pittsburgh
‘Russian Cine-Politics (2017): Memory, Amnesia, and Risk’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Thursday 23 November 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Dr Louise Johnson, University of Sheffield
‘Guillem Viladot and a Tradition of Trans’
4-5.30pm, School V, St Salvator's Quadrangle

Thursday 7 December 2017
School of Modern Languages Research Seminars Series
Conflict and Change
Dr Jens Hentschke, Newcastle University
'Conflict and Change in Uruguay, 1868-1915: The Transformation of a Notorious Nineteenth-Century Trouble Spot into Latin America's First Welfare State Democracy'
4-5.30pm, Bute Lecture Theatre A

Thursday 13 December 2017
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Objects: Photographs & Portraits (& a Musical Score)
Concept: Celebrity
Ricardo Fernández, Will Fowler & Margarita Vaysman, School of Modern Languages
Ricardo will explore the impact on Spanish autobiographical writing of the proliferation of the public image of professional writers thanks to the use and circulation of photography in the newspapers and magazines of the last third of the 19th century. Will will, in turn, analyse how Mexican conservative General Miguel Miramón became a celebrity/pin up of sorts during the Civil War of the Reforma (1857-61) (including having polkas composed in his honour). And Margarita will reflect on two portraits of Alexei Pisemskiiof, one of the Russian writers she is currently working on, in both of which he looks famously anxious, with bulging eyes (he was among those who thought a camera would steal his soul!)
5-6:30pm Quad Room 32

For the information on past seminars, please visit our Seminar Archive.

2017/18 Research Seminar Programme

Semester 2

Wednesday 14 February 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Andy Murphy, School of English
Concepts: Literacy, education and politics
In his seminal statement of the modernist theory of nationalism (Nations and Nationalism, 1983), Ernest Gellner tied the rise of nationalism to the context of industrialisation in the nineteenth century, arguing that the systematisation required by industrialising societies demanded standardised forms of knowledge that could only be provided at the level of the state. To provide such knowledge, governments needed to set up formal educational systems. In Gellner's view, these systems served ultimately to create a homogenised culture, in the process calling into being a recognisable form of national identity. While Gellner’s model is compelling, the effects of the wider availability of education and the spread of literacy in the nineteenth century were, it might be argued, neither quite so uniform nor so predictable. Andy has taken up this issue in two separate research projects. He has looked at working-class readers’ encounters with Shakespeare in the nineteenth century and has registered the ways in which, for many of these readers, Shakespeare’s work served as a source of inspiration for programmes of radical political activism. He has also looked at the impact of the rise of literacy in Ireland in the same period. Here, an examination of the schoolbooks used in the educational system would appear to provide support for Gellner’s thesis, since they are geared towards inculcating a strongly British identity, at the expense of any distinctive Irishness. Yet this very process in itself prompted a significant counter movement in Ireland which, in 1916, culminated in a separatist uprising in Dublin. In the Irish instance, then, late nineteenth century/early twentieth century nationalism can be said to be produced in reaction against the process that Gellner identifies as the standard mechanism of nationalism. For Andy’s session, then, he would like to explore the complex implications of the expansion of education and the rise of literacy across the span of the nineteenth century.
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room

Wednesday 14 March 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Object: Maps
Bernhard Struck, School of History & Mary Orr, School of Modern Languages
Bernhard will discuss a concrete map, sharing his findings on cartography in the 19th century and his work on "Mapping Germanies. Cartography, Territories and National Spaces, 1770s-1880s". Mary will analyse a ‘map’ of  Bathurst (1823) in Mrs Bowdich’s scientific travel narrative Excursions to Madeira and Porto Santo, 1825 (English Ed.; 1826 French ed.), and explore the question of locating female and non-colonial map-makers.
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room

Wednesday 18 April 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Object: Illustrations of flowers from translation anthologies
Concept: German Naturalism
Andrew Cusack and Michael White, School of Modern Languages
Andrew will explore the Translation Anthology in 19th-Century Europe and what forms did collections of the ‘flowers’ of the lyric poetry of nations (anthologia, Blumenlese) take and what functions did they fulfil. Starting with pictures of some translation anthologies from Germany and the UK the aim is to get answers to questions of form and function from across Europe. Michael will reflect, in contrast, on character and authority (and adultery) in German Naturalist Drama”
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room

Wednesday 16 May 2018
C19c Brown paper-bag research seminar series 2017-18
“Sharing a 19th-Century Object and/or Concept”
Emma Sutton, School of English
Object: A photograph of Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson playing his flageolet in Hawaii.
Emma will briefly introduce some aspects of the common but under explored practice of music-making in colonial settings. Stevenson’s example illustrates some of the research questions, pleasures and difficulties in thinking about European music globally in the nineteenth century.
1-2pm, Byre Conference Room